Best 10 Ply Tires for Towing: Buyer’s Guide & Reviews

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Last updated: April 21, 2023 by Tire Deets

When we talk about tires on this website, we often state that it is very important to choose high-quality tires in order to make your car safer and more reliable. And while that is undeniable, wait until we start talking about towing. As much as the tires are important for passenger vehicles, they are even more important for towing. If you think about it, when you attach a trailer to your truck, you add a lot of weight.

If the tires you have on your truck aren’t ready for towing (at least 10 Ply rating), then they will start to bend in the first corner you encounter. They will also degrade much more quickly and have much worse high-speed stability. To be completely safe when towing using your truck, you will need 10 Ply or Load Range E tires. The best 10 Ply tires for towing should be capable of at least 3,000 lbs of weight per tire and do it while giving you a safe driving experience with a high amount of grip and traction.

The thing is, there are a lot of “10 Ply” options on the market today. That makes choosing the best towing tires for your needs a pretty daunting task. On top of that, these tires are often divided into different categories. To make the most out of your new tires, you will also need to look for the best type of tire for your needs. More precisely, you need to calculate how much you drive on and off the road to choose the best one.

Luckily, you’ve come to the right place to learn everything there is to know about 10 Ply tires. To help you choose the right set of towing tires, we will also give you the list of the Top 11 best 10 Ply truck tires for towing, where we will include every type of tire that you might want to install on your pickup truck or SUV. Then, we created a short buying guide where you will learn everything there is to know about the best tires for towing.

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The Best 10 Ply Tires for Towing that You Can Buy

1. Continental TerrainContact H/T

Best Highway 10 Ply Tires for Towing

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Pros

  • Best longitudinal and lateral rain traction of any highway all-season tire
  • Very balanced handling and predictable behavior at the limit on wet tarmac
  • Excellent grip and natural handling in dry conditions
  • Responsive and linear steering
  • Very good stability when towing or hauling heavy cargo (10-ply dimensions)
  • Solid light-snow traction and drivability
  • Smooth ride over most surfaces and quiet rolling at higher speeds
  • Excellent treadlife (reported by owners)
  • Long treadwear warranty

Cons

  • It might be expensive for some

Right now, there is no better highway all-season tire for trucks and SUVs than the TerrainContact H/T. Besides the fact that it’s not designed for off-roading, Continental’s new entry into the truck tire category leaves the competition in its dust in almost every category. The TerrainContact H/T is the new benchmark in the category upon which other tires will be measured.

Since Continental’s highway tire is excellent in almost every category, we’ll start with the part that impressed us the most – wet traction. With the TerrainContact H/T, you’ll almost forget about traction issues when it’s raining, even though we still recommend driving more slowly than you would on dry roads.

But really, the TerrainContact H/T excels in the rain. The longitudinal traction is the best in its category, which translates to the shortest stopping distances and strongest acceleration. And it’s not even close – the braking distances, especially, are way shorter than on any other premium highway all-season tire.

Continental’s highway tire doesn’t stop to impress in the corners. The lateral grip is again leaps and bounds higher than the competition – you can drive at a few mph higher with the TerrainContact H/T than with other highway all-season tires in the rain. But it’s not only that – this tire also feels very balanced at the limit, and it’s easy to correct when it eventually loses traction. Not to mention the hydroplaning resistance is also exemplary.

Unlike other excellent rain tires, though, the TerrainContact H/T remains grippy in dry conditions. Like in the rain, the lateral grip is the highest of any highway all-season tire, and the stopping distances are the shortest. In addition to that, the steering is surprisingly responsive, which might not be important for truck drivers, but still welcome nonetheless.

What you need from a truck-oriented tire is stability under load, and the TerrainContact H/T delivers. Whether hauling heavy cargo in the bed or towing a large trailer, this tire provides excellent stability and straight-line tracking. This is especially true with load range E (10-ply) sizes specifically designed for higher loads.

The TerrainContact H/T also performs very well on light snow. Its traction is among the highest in the category, especially when braking. It also feels balanced and stable in the corners, with a very good grip. Of course, ice will be an issue, just like with every other all-season tire, but even there, Continental’s truck tire performs better than most.

And if that wasn’t enough, this tire is also among the most comfortable in the category. It is noise-free at urban speeds and only slightly audible on the highway, with low-frequency noise usually covered by wind noise. The ride is also very smooth over most surfaces, with only sharp cracks on the road disturbing, producing some vibrations.

Although the TerrainContact H/T is a highway tire designed for large SUVs and trucks, it isn’t very good on loose terrains. Notably, it lacks enough traction for anything more serious than gravel and dirt, and the casing doesn’t seem as sturdy as on the Michelin Defender LTX M/S.

Since it’s a premium tire with only a few compromises, the TerrainContact H/T will cost more than most highway all-season tires. Still, Continental provides an excellent 60,000-mile warranty on 10-ply LT-metric sizes (70,000 miles on regular P-metric sizes), and owners report excellent real-world treadlife.

2. Michelin Defender LTX M/S

Best Highway 10 Ply Tires for Towing

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Pros

  • Natural handling and excellent grip on dry roads
  • Excellent stability when towing or hauling heavy cargo
  • Good traction and drivability in rainy conditions
  • Solid traction and handling on light snow
  • Very smooth ride over most surfaces
  • Quiet on the highway
  • Very strong and durable casing
  • Long treadlife and excellent treadwear warranty

Cons

  • Nervous at the limit of traction on wet tarmac
  • It might be expensive for some

Michelin’s LTX M/S2 highway all-season tire was the most popular in its category in the past decade, thanks to its combination of good dry/wet/snow traction, comfortable and quiet ride, and class-leading treadlife. The Defender LTX M/S builds upon that model and improves in almost every category.

However, in the past, Michelin didn’t have as much competition as it does today in the highway all-season category. Now, the Defender LTX M/S must compete with the outstanding Continental TerrainContact H/T, the Firestone Destination LE3, and Bridgestone Dueler H/T 685.

Overall, Continental stole the show with the TerrainContact H/T, though the Defender LTX M/S has some redeeming qualities. For instance, Michelin’s highway all-season tire is generally more comfortable, particularly over sharp and repetitive impacts. The Defender absorbs harsh impacts better and doesn’t produce secondary motion like the TerrainContact H/T. It is also similarly quiet as its German rival, both on smooth and broken roads.

You also won’t have any issues with traction. Although not as grippy in rainy conditions as the TerrainContact H/T, the Defender LTX M/S is still an excellent wet tire. The stopping distances are still among the shortest in the category, and acceleration traction is excellent. However, Michelin’s tire suffers more in the corners, as it has less grip and loses traction more abruptly. Not a big issue on the street, but notable nonetheless.

You won’t be disappointed with how the Defender LTX M/S handles dry roads, though. The lateral grip is excellent, but more importantly, the steering is very responsive and precise. With these tires on, your truck/SUV will feel more agile and better to drive. Also, it will always stop on time – the braking distances are among the shortest in the category.

Like its predecessors, the Defender LTX M/S remains the best towing tire in its category. Thanks to the stiff construction, Michelin’s highway all-season tire provides excellent stability with a trailer attached, aided by solid dry/wet traction. The same holds true when you carry heavy loads in the bed, with the Defender LTX M/S handling the added weight without any issue.

As for light snow, the Defender LTX M/S performs pretty well for the category. It is easy to drive thanks to the balanced and surefooted handling, with a solid lateral grip that gives you peace of mind. Moreover, the braking distances are short for a highway all-season tire, and we found that the tire has enough acceleration traction so you don’t get stuck on snow.

Still, this is not the tire for people living in very harsh wintry conditions. Although comparable to other highway all-season tires on ice, the Defender LTX M/S isn’t really usable on icy roads, especially when you encounter inclines/declines. Also, you won’t have enough digging power in unpacked snow, though that’s not too different from its rivals.

Michelin’s LTX family was always known for longevity. The previous models were praised by owners for their treadlife, but also the casing’s stiffness and resistance to punctures and cuts. Hence, there is no reason to doubt the durability of the Defender LTX M/S, which should be the best in the category. Still, 10-ply rated sizes with an R-speed rating come with a 50,000-mile treadwear warranty, which is slightly lower than the Continental TerrainContact H/T. But regardless, it’s very good for an LT-metric tire designed for heavy-duty tasks, and the real-life treadlife should be similar to its closest rival.

3. General Grabber HTS60

Best Highway 10 Ply Tires for Towing

Best 10 Ply Tires for Towing

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Pros

  • Heavy-duty versions are excellent for towing
  • Quiet and comfortable
  • Fair price

Cons

  • Heavy-duty versions are worse good in the rain

Much like the Cooper Discoverer HTP, the Grabber HTS60 offers excellent performance at a lower price point than premium competitors. Unlike many highway tires, the Grabber HTS60 is made from a cut- and chip-resistant compound that makes it useful for driving on gravel.

On the road, the Grabber HTS60 offers excellent high-speed stability, even with a large trailer attached. In the corners, this tire is very responsive and offers high levels of grip and traction. That said, even though it is good, the Load Range E versions lack enough circumferential grooves for excellent heavy rain performance.

On the positive side, the Grabber HTS60 comes with a 50,000-mile treadwear warranty for LT Sizes & H-Speed Rated models, pretty good for the price.

4. Kumho Crugen HT51

Best Highway 10 Ply Tires for Towing

Best 10 Ply Tires for Towing

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Pros

  • Excellent dry and wet performance
  • Very good high-speed stability
  • Light snow traction
  • Budget price

Cons

  • The 45,000-mile treadwear warranty is lower than the class average

The Crugen HT51 is another budget-oriented highway tire, but one that can be used for heavy-duty stuff, like towing, for example. According to Kumho, this tire is designed with an optimized geometric block layout for maximum treadlife. That said, the 45,000-mile treadwear warranty for LT-Metric sizes is not on the level of the best highway tires.

On the road, the Kumho provides the driver with excellent high-speed stability and very responsive drive in the corners, even with a trailer attached. Grip and traction are also very good, while the stopping distances are short. Unlike its competitors, the Crugen HT51 is 3PMSF rated, which means that it is more usable in light snow. The hydroplaning resistance is also very good, which translates into excellent wet performance.

Comfort is pretty good, too, and there is not a lot of noise on the highway.

5. Firestone Transforce HT2

Best Highway 10 Ply Tires for Towing and Hauling

Best 10 Ply Tires for Towing

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Pros

  • Excellent high-speed stability when towing
  • Outstanding wet performance
  • Chip- and -tear-resistant casing

Cons

  • No treadwear warranty

The second version of the Transforce HT brings several improvements that launch it among the best-in-class highway tires. Due to the “commercial” LT rating, this tire can be used for very heavy-duty stuff, such as towing very large trailers. This is also one of the most stable tires with a trailer attached, very important for safety during towing.

The Transforce HT2 is also very responsive and provides the driver with very high levels of grip, traction, and braking. Thanks to the zig-zag sipes in the tread blocks, wet traction is improved compared to the previous models and is now among the best in the category.

That said, while the chip- and tear-resistant casing seems to be the toughest in the category, Firestone doesn’t cover it with any treadwear warranty, which is a shame.

6. Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure with Kevlar

Best All-Terrain 10 Ply Truck Tires for Towing

Best 10 Ply Tires for Towing

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Pros

  • Tough construction
  • Usable on every off-road surface
  • Surprisingly good on the road
  • Usable in light snow
  • Best-in-class 60,000-mile treadwear warranty

Cons

  • Noise on the highway

The Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure includes Kevlar in the casing, which makes it the most durable all-terrain tire right now. Naturally, this means that it will be great for towing. It even comes with a 60,000-mile treadwear warranty on all models, unlike other all-terrain tires. The Wrangler is one of the best off-road tires in its category, providing the driver with excellent traction in rocks, dirt, and mud.

On the road, this tire is among the best in its category, as well. It provides the driver with excellent grip and traction, outstanding high-speed stability, and very good responsiveness. Finally, the Wrangler is even usable in light snow, thanks to the 3PMSF rating. That said, we experienced higher-than-usual noise on the highway.

7. BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2

Best All-Terrain 10 Ply Truck Tires for Towing

Best 10 Ply Tires for Towing

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Pros

  • Outstanding off-road abilities
  • Extremely durable and strong
  • Stable with a trailer attached
  • Very good on-road traction

Cons

  • Far from the quietest all-terrain tire

If you want an all-terrain tire that will cover on-road, off-road, and trailer duties, the BFGoodrich T/A KO2 is one of the best choices out there. For off-road purposes, this tire is one of the best in the category, providing the driver with very high levels of traction on almost every surface, including gravel, rocks, sand, and mud. Thanks to the Sidewall Armor, it is also cut- and chip-resistant, and puncture-resistant.

On-road performance is very good as well. High-speed stability is one of the best in the business, and the tires don’t feel cumbersome at all in the corners. The BFGoodrich offers very good wet traction and braking and one of the best light snow traction performances in the category (it has the 3PMSF rating). That said, it can be noisy on the highway. On top of that, even though standard models come with a 50,000-mile treadwear warranty, the LT sizes don’t come with any warranty.

8. Yokohama GEOLANDAR M/T G003

Best Maximum Traction 10 Ply Truck Tires for Towing

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Pros

  • Outstanding traction over large rocks (rock-crawling) and in deep mud
  • Excellent performance on dirt and gravel
  • Good highway stability when towing and hauling heavy cargo
  • Strong dry and wet traction for a mud tire
  • Not as noisy as other mud tires on the highway
  • Excellent traction over unpacked snow

Cons

  • Not usable over packed snow or ice

Looking for a 10-ply (load range E) tire for the most challenging terrains? The GEOLANDAR M/T G003 has got you covered. Yokohama’s latest aggressive off-road tire is a true best on slippery terrain, with traction that only a few other tires can rival.

We tried this tire in deep mud, over large rocks, and on sandy surfaces, and it never missed a beat. You really need to be doing some crazy stuff to get stuck with the GEOLANDAR M/T G003 or make serious rookie mistakes. Still, this off-road tire will cover most of your errors thanks to the immense traction.

But the best thing about the GEOLANDAR M/T G003 is that it combines its off-road prowess with exceptional on-road abilities. Sure, it won’t perform as well as Yokohama’s all-terrain offering, the GEOLANDAR A/T G015, but it’s outstanding compared to most of its rivals.

For starters, the GEOLANDAR M/T G003 won’t have any issues carrying heavy loads. Available in load range C, D, and E, Yokohama’s mud tire is ready to get its hands full of heavy cargo and keep your SUV/truck stable when towing large trailers. The sidewalls are stiff, which brings stability on the highway that few rivals can match.

The traction is also there. We never had issues with losing traction while accelerating on dry tarmac, and the braking distances are among the shortest in the category. Also, the GEOLANDAR M/T G003 feels balanced in the corners and provides as much grip as expected from such an aggressive tread pattern with a large void area.

The GEOLANDAR M/T G003 is also pretty good in wet conditions. Here, it struggles a bit more with traction while accelerating, and you’ll need to predict things in advance as the stopping distances are longer.

But you know what? Other mud tires are even worse in this regard, and Yokohama can’t change the rules of physics – aggressive off-road tires will always lack on-road traction. Besides, the GEOLANDAR M/T G003 feels natural in the corners and provides a higher grip than most of its rivals.

What about snow, though? Like most mud tires out there, the GEOLANDAR M/T G003 doesn’t perform very well on packed snow – the type you usually encounter on the road. Put simply, this tire lacks the small zig-zag sipes of winter/all-season tires, meaning there are fewer biting edges to create traction. It’s the same story on icy surfaces, where the G003 won’t hold a candle to regular winter tires.

However, the opposite happens on unpacked snow – the type you usually encounter when off-roading. Here, the large blocks and high void area churn through the unpacked snow, giving you traction like almost no other tire. So, I believe you can see a pattern here – the GEOLANDAR M/T G003 is an off-road beast, regardless of the weather.

As a cherry on top, the GEOLANDAR M/T G003 is reasonably comfortable for a mud tire. The ride is plush over smooth roads and only a bit harsh when you go over a pothole, and noise is not an issue on the highway. Sure, you will hear the tires, but the noise isn’t nearly as pronounced as on other mud tires.

9. BFGoodrich Mud Terrain T/A KM3

Best Maximum Traction 10 Ply Truck Tires for Towing

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Pros

  • Exceptional traction in deep mud and outstanding rock-crawling ability
  • Very good traction on sand, dirt, and gravel
  • Very stiff construction that resists cuts, chips, and punctures
  • Balanced handling and good grip on dry roads
  • Not very noisy at lower speeds
  • Excellent traction on unpacked snow

Cons

  • Firm ride over sharp imperfections and noise on the highway
  • Not as good as its closest rivals in rainy conditions
  • Abysmal traction over packed snow

Another mud tire we are particularly fond of is BFGoodrich’s T/A KM3. The American tire brand is most famous for its off-road tires developed at events like Baja and Dakar Rally, and the T/A KM3 is the culmination of the company’s years of racing and winning.

So, as you’d expect, the T/A KM3 is quite the beast off the beaten path. You can rely on this tire on the most challenging terrains out there and even compete with your buddies. Rock crawling? No problem. Going through deep mud? A piece of cake. Navigating sand dunes? A walk in the park. The T/A KM3 is simply outstanding in those situations, providing traction that few other rivals can match.

BFGoodrich’s mud tire continues its domination on dirt and gravel. The grip is undoubtedly there, but the rugged and durable tread and construction impress even more. You can’t easily puncture this tire, and the tread blocks will keep their shape when you drive over abrasive surfaces. Not to mention, the stiff sidewall lets you drive at very low pressures, provided you combine the T/A KM3 with beaded wheels.

You must think that to achieve such outstanding off-road traction and durability, BFGoodrich sacrificed on-road traction. But you’d be wrong, as the T/A KM3 continues to perform well on the street, particularly in dry conditions. It provides enough grip to keep you safe and feels balanced and natural in the corners.

Moreover, thanks to the stiff construction and high load ratings, the T/A KM3 keeps you stable when hauling heavy cargo or towing a large trailer.

The T/A KM3 is only average when it rains, meaning it’s on the level of most rivals. Thanks to the sizeable void area, the hydroplaning resistance is there, and you won’t lose stability when driving through puddles of water.

Still, wet traction is lower than on the class-leading tires, meaning the stopping distances are slightly longer, and you’ll need to drive more slowly in the corners. There is still enough grip to keep you planted if you drive at legal speeds, but when tested against the Yokohama GEOLANDAR M/T G003, the T/A KM3 is slightly worse in the rain.

As for snow, the BFGoodrich T/A KM3 performs similarly to most of its rivals. Namely, it’s not very good at tackling compacted snow and ice because it lacks the small sipes needed to increase the biting edges. However, the tire can churn through unpacked snow thanks to the large tread blocks, just like it does in mud. Thus, if you drive on off-road trails that few other SUVs/trucks visited, you’ll have no traction issues.

However, the T/A KM3 is not a very comfortable tire. It is quiet at lower speeds in urban scenarios, but you’ll definitely hear the tires on the highway. Also, due to the stiffer sidewalls that help you with hauling and towing, the T/A KM3 can be harsh over sharp and repetitive impacts.

On the bright side, though, owners are delighted with the treadlife of the T/A KM3, which might be the longest in the category.

10. Bridgestone Blizzak LT

Best Winter 10 Ply Truck Tires for Towing

Best 10 Ply Tires for Towing

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Pros

  • Outstanding traction and braking on snow
  • Handling on snow is superb
  • Works over ice as well
  • Good performance on dry and wet pavement

Cons

  • No treadwear warranty

Bridgestone recently replaced the popular Blizzak W965 winter truck tire with the Blizzak LT. The new model brings several improvements to the table, most of them aimed at improving winter traction.

For instance, the Blizzak LT now has 30% more biting edges, which dramatically increases the traction in snow. Now, you can tackle some very serious winter conditions with this tire. Longitudinal traction is outstanding, which means that you won’t get stuck anywhere, but also stop shortly when needed. The Blizzak LT also handles well in the snow, providing the driver with surefooted handling.

Ice traction is also improved compared to the previous model. Now, sure, you can get even better performance from a studdable tire. However, as far as regular winter tires go, the Blizzak LT is among the best for ice traction, braking, and handling.

The Bridgestone heavy-duty winter tire also works well on dry and wet roads. It feels responsive and provides the driver with excellent grip and traction. Crucially, thanks to the tough construction and advanced tread compound, you can expect outstanding stability when towing.

Bridgestone doesn’t offer any treadwear warranty on the tire, although they claim increased treadlife. The Japanese tiremaker should definitely follow Michelin in providing treadwear warranties on the winter tire family. Despite that, though, the Blizzak is the best 10-ply tire for winter driving currently.

11. Goodyear WinterCommand (LT)

Best Winter 10 Ply Truck Tires for Towing

Best 10 Ply Tires for Towing

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Pros

  • Excellent performance in very cold conditions
  • Very good snow traction
  • Studdable for even better snow traction and braking

Cons

  • No treadwear warranty

The Goodyear WinterCommand for LT-metric sizes is slightly cheaper than the Michelin LTX Winter, yet it offers almost the same performance on the road. Thanks to the winter-focused compound, this tire provides its driver with excellent performance in very cold conditions, including dry and wet conditions, as well as snow and ice. The WinterCommand is also studdable, which means that you can make it a beast for snow driving. That said, this tire doesn’t come with any treadwear warranty.

Best 10 Ply Truck Tires for Towing: Buying Guide

1. What is 10 Ply?

In the past, Ply ratings signified how many “plies” a tire had. The more plies a tire had, the tougher and stronger it was. The number of plies also signified how much weight could a single tire carry. In other words, the more plies you had on your towing tires, the better it is for hauling and towing.

However, modern tires don’t come with a very large number of plies. Even the toughest tires today come with three to four plies but still can carry the same weight of 10 Ply or even 12 Ply tires. The reason is pretty straightforward – the rubber compound in modern tires is much more advanced and doesn’t require a large number of plies to achieve an excellent Ply rating.

Instead of the Ply rating, manufacturers today use “Load Range” ratings. For the buyer, these ratings have the same significance as Ply ratings. Really, why would you care how many plies a tire has if it gets the job done? To make things easier for you, here is how the previous Ply and modern-day Load Range ratings compare:

  • Load Range B (4-ply tire) – max load pressure: 35 psi (240kPa) – not useful for towing
  • Load Range C (6-ply tire) – max load pressure: 50 psi (350kPa) – useful only for very small trailers
  • Load Range D (8-ply tire) – max load pressure: 65 psi (450kPa) – useful only for smaller trailers
  • Load Range E (10-ply tire) – max load pressure: 80 psi (550kPa) – great for smaller and larger trailers
  • Load Range F (12-ply tire) – max load pressure: 95 psi (650kPa) – heavy-duty tires for very large trailers and trucks

As you can see from the list, Load Range E tires are similar to 10 Ply tires and meet the same needs. The Load Range E rating is the most popular in the truck world today simply because it offers a good combination of great handling when with or without a trailer attached. 12 Ply or Load Range F tires are geared more towards commercial applications and don’t work very well when the truck is not loaded, while 8 Ply or Load Range D tires are only good for smaller trailers.

2. The Significance of “LT” in Tire Specifications

Most truck and SUV tires today are offered either in P-Metric form or LT form. Although we are talking about the same tire here (for example, the Michelin Defender LTX), P-Metric and LT tires are very different. Here are their main differences:

  • P-Metric tires – made for lighter SUVs and crossovers. These tires are specifically designed to offer advanced driving dynamics in the corners, better high-speed stability, and overall a more comfortable and quieter ride. However, P-Metric tires are a poor choice for people who tow frequently with their SUVs and crossovers. They are also not designed to meet the needs of pickup truck owners, regardless of the towing situation.
  • LT (Light Truck) tires – made for larger SUVs and trucks. These tires are specifically designed to work better under load. When buying a set of the best truck tires for towing (or hauling), you should always choose the LT versions. Sure, they might be a bit worse when the truck is not loaded, but on the other hand, they are much safer when you tow a big trailer.

3. Highway Tires are the Best 10 Ply Choice for People That Only Drive on the Road

After you learned how to find a 10 Ply tire between the plethora of choices out there, let’s now have a look at the types of towing tires you will encounter. Highway tires are the most prevalent on the market simply because they cover the basic needs of the average truck driver. Almost every single highway tire is available in Load Range E rating (some are only available in Load Range D), and every single one of them is available in LT (Light Truck) form. This means that most highway tires will easily tow bigger trailers.

On top of that, highway tires are designed to give you the best possible driving experience on the road. Compared to off-road-focused tires, highway tires offer much better responsiveness on the road and make your truck much easier to drive. They also provide the driver with much better traction, even on more powerful trucks, and better grip in the corners. Highway tires work excellently in wet conditions, thanks to the circumferential grooves in the tread and the higher number of sipes in the tread blocks.

As far as comfort goes, highway tires offer the best ride quality of any other LT tire you may find on the market. They are also much quieter on the highway, even with a large trailer attached. Finally, these tires are the most durable of any other LT tire on the market. The best highway tires for towing come with a 70,000-mile treadwear warranty, which is simply amazing for tires that will be used for towing.

Important note: we will also include winter tires in the list below for truck owners that live in areas with harsh wintry weather. These tires offer a completely safe and reliable driving experience in the winter, including deep snow.

4. All-Terrain and Mud-Terrain Tires are the Best Choices for Off-Roading

While highway tires are the most balanced tire type of all, and some of them can even work on gravel, we strongly suggest going for all-terrain or mud-terrain tires if you do a lot of off-roading with your truck. Most of these tires today are available in Load Range E form, which means that they will be useful for towing big trailers and hauling heavy cargo.

All-terrain tires are the better choice for most people simply because they offer a balanced driving experience. In other words, they work both for off-roading and on-road driving. The best all-terrain tires offer significantly better off-road traction than highway tires. For the average truck driver, the best all-terrain tires are more than good enough, regardless of the surface. They work on gravel, dirt, rocks, mud, and even sand.

On top of that, all-terrain tires are also pretty good for on-road driving. They are worse when compared to highway tires, of course, but still provide enough grip, traction, and high-speed stability for a safe and reliable driving experience. That said, you might notice a bump up in noise, especially on the highway. In terms of durability, all-terrain tires have slightly shorter treadlife than highway tires but are generally made tougher. For example, most all-terrain tires are cut and chip-resistant, and puncture-resistant, which makes them a much better choice for driving on uneven terrains than highway tires.

Mud-terrain or maximum traction tires are an even better choice for off-roading than all-terrain tires. These tires are specifically designed to meet the needs of off-road enthusiasts. Thanks to that, they offer by far the best traction in mud, but also other off-road surfaces such as dirt and rocks. They are also made from much tougher casings, which gives them an even better cut and chip resistance and puncture resistance.

That said, mud-terrain tires are also much worse on the road. Even at lower speeds, they produce a lot more noise, and some of them become unbearable on the highway. They also don’t offer the same high-speed stability, traction, or grip, especially on wet surfaces. Still, this is something that most off-road enthusiasts are willing to overlook in the quest for better off-road traction.

Final Words

As you can see from our list above, we only included towing tires from reputable and well-known manufacturers. Towing large trailers is no joke when it comes to safety, and some cheap tires are often not up to the task. They don’t offer nearly the same stability at higher speeds and will degrade very quickly. If you’re serious about towing, always choose high-quality tires. 

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10 thoughts on “Best 10 Ply Tires for Towing: Buyer’s Guide & Reviews”

    • Hi,

      The Defender LTX M/S is available in Load Range E with max load
      are 4,080 lbs
      Please don’t hesitate to comment again if you have other questions regarding the Defender LTX M/S or any other tire for that matter.

      Best regards!

      Reply
  1. I bought Michelin tire for my new F-150 and I was curious to see how they lasted. Granted I live in southern Calif so the only road condition to speak of heats. But, by the time I replace this set, they will be right at 58,000 miles and I could probably go another 5k but with winter approaching the tread is getting a bit shallow so playing it safe. I have never gotten more than 40k on car or truck in the past, so must admit I have been very impressed with these tires.

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  2. I’ve never purchased Michelin tires for my trucks before but this time I did. I expect these tires to perform like the Michelin passenger tires I’ve purchased in the past, which is outstanding. So far the traction, ride, cornering, braking are what I’d expect from Michelin. I hate paying this much for tires, but the return is worth it. For the record, it was between Bridgestone or Michelin. I had Bridgestone’s on my Suburban with no complaints. Bridgestone’s were a lot cheaper but my gut told me to invest in Michelin’s this time around with my Yukon.

    Reply
  3. I have a 2016 Silverado 1500 pickup truck and we do hauling every weekend pulling a 7×16 trailer. We do must of the hauling in the summer months and then drive to work in the winter months. When pulling the trailer, I am looking for a tire that will hold up to the miles we pull but am also looking for a tire that gives a smooth quiet ride while pulling on the highway. We hit some roads that are not the best and it feels like I’m on a roller coaster on the road. But also need a tire that will work good in snow when driving to work in the winter. What do you recommend.

    Reply
  4. This was a helpful primer on towing. I’m still debating on what to buy. We purchased our 2010 Ford Expedition used and it came with slightly larger Cooper Discoverer LT tires. After a recent trip towing our travel trailer, we have a hole that wouldn’t stay plugged. The original size tires have very few LT options. What’s a person supposed to do when there’s so few options?

    Reply
  5. The traction on Michelin tire is one of the best in my experience. I had to drive my vehicle in stormy weather when I swerved to the right and immediately to the left to avoid a collision with another car. During that incident, this tire did not lose grip, allowing my truck and me to escape the incident unscathed.

    Reply
    • But I should mention that the tire holds onto rocks particularly better than others that it may become a shortcoming. Think of holding a ball down while a spring is trying to push in the other direction. That becomes a similar experience with this tire.

      Reply
  6. The Falken tire is a great tire that I choose for my 93 Jeep Wrangler. I love these truck tires. I never imagined I’d ever had traction in wet weather as these things give me. Definitely the best tires I’ve had on my truck. I can say that this tire doesn’t wear easily even if I drive it on slippery, icy, and rocky roads. Also, it has minimal noise and the tires are holding up well. The performance is solid I must say.

    Reply

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